Going Pro With Photographs

If you look at most successful food blogs they all have beautiful photos of their food. So I thought I’d tell you about a book that shows, in detail, how a pro does it. (click on the photos for a larger image.)

In Food Styling by Delores Custer, she takes you step by step through the process, covering subjects like food substitutes, proper tools, lighting, and room temperature, right up to the final photograph.
cover of Food Styling book

However, there are a couple of things you need to be aware of. First, the food is rarely edible when she’s finished, and second, her book isn’t cheap, I got mine used for $32 including shipping. But, if you want to take professional food photographs this book illustrates how to get the shot right for magazines and ads. -Beyond that look carefully at the lighting, you can learn a lot.

Using this turkey as an example, you have to agree, that by the time she was finished doctoring the bird it looked better than it would in real life.

These are the phases it goes through.
photo of the stages in prepping the turkey

And this is the finished product.
compledted photo of turkey

As a side note; she swears she can’t function without mortician’s wax, it’s also called museum wax, they make all kinds, but I’ve used mini-hold ever since I discovered it in a hobby shop. (I use it to hold rings and such in place while I photograph jewelry.)

Now my two cents worth.

Ice cream is a bitch! You need to do all your prep work before hand and keep it in the refrigerator. If it’s something that will discolor after it’s cut, do that last, allow for plenty of waste, and if necessary, put it in a bowl of lemon water. Then dry it well before plating it. Keep your plates cold and the room cool. If you are going to use continuous light use fluorescents, they don’t heat things up. Strobes are better because they generate even less heat.

Or you can just say to heck with it and use fake ice cream.

One last thought, if you’re going to photograph food, you need props, lots of pots, jars, cookie sheets, and silverware. The local Goodwill or Salvation Army store are great places to start.

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I’m totally aware that, for a post on photography, these photos suck, in fact, most of them were taken with my phone under fluorescent kitchen lights. But this blog is intended solely to help me keep track of, and share my recipes.

Heck, I don’t even know where most of the recipes came from. So if anyone wants to try them, great. They can even take them and call them theirs.